Freddie Flintoff’s Field of Dreams’ celebrated by critics and viewers
15th July 2022
‘FREDDIE FLINTOFF’S FIELD OF DREAMS’, A BRAND NEW 3 PART DOCUMENTARY PRODUCED BY SOUTH SHORE FOR THE BBC, CONCLUDED ON TUESDAY 19TH JULY AND WAS SEEN BY A PEAK AUDIENCE OF 2 MILLION.

The documentary, which is available to watch on BBC iplayer, has been hailed as “uplifting”and “heart-warming” by viewers, and has been met with much critical acclaim.

The Sun  

If Freddie Flintoff doesn’t win a BAFTA for this show, you wouldn’t blame him if he jumped in his pedalo and headed out of the UK.  The most moving TV series of the year came to an end when his team of reluctant cricketers – picked from working class areas of his home town of Preston – took on a local boarding school.”

Heat magazine: 

“I’ll watch anything with Freddie Flintoff in, and I really enjoyed Freddie Flintoff’s Field of Dreams.  Once you get past the drama of ep one about whether any kids will turn up to his cricket team building, ep two really gets going, as we hear the kids’ back stories and seeFreddie’s influence on them.  Special shout out to Afghan refugee Adnan, who is a total ledge.”

The Arts Desk: 

“Flintoff, an emphatically not-posh Lancastrian, is proving to be a skilful motivator, able to combine common sense and a sympathetic manner with a dose of confrontational bluntness when required. As one of his coaching assistants, former Lancashire teammate Kyle Hogg, remarks of their raw recruits, “there are a couple who test you to the absolute maximum.” It’s part of the show’s game-plan to throw in some social observation and real-life stories of struggle against the odds, and the tale of how Flintoff gradually pulls his initially reluctant band of young scruffs into something resembling a team can only be described as heart-warming.”

The Cricketer:   

“Visibility, image and perception are problems for cricket at all levels, from the professional game right the way down to grassroots clubs. Whether it’s fair or not, cricket is associated with elitism, racism, wealth and cliques.  And while Flintoff’s documentary only scratches the surface of these issues and the potential solutions, shining the light on just one community – Preston’s forgotten male youth, it will hopefully trigger conversations, some of them possibly unwelcome, which will shape the future of cricket.”

15th July 2022

Freddie Flintoff’s Field of Dreams’ celebrated by critics and viewers

‘FREDDIE FLINTOFF’S FIELD OF DREAMS’, A BRAND NEW 3 PART DOCUMENTARY PRODUCED BY SOUTH SHORE FOR THE BBC, CONCLUDED ON TUESDAY 19TH JULY AND WAS SEEN BY A PEAK AUDIENCE OF 2 MILLION.

The documentary, which is available to watch on BBC iplayer, has been hailed as “uplifting”and “heart-warming” by viewers, and has been met with much critical acclaim.

The Sun  

If Freddie Flintoff doesn’t win a BAFTA for this show, you wouldn’t blame him if he jumped in his pedalo and headed out of the UK.  The most moving TV series of the year came to an end when his team of reluctant cricketers – picked from working class areas of his home town of Preston – took on a local boarding school.”

Heat magazine: 

“I’ll watch anything with Freddie Flintoff in, and I really enjoyed Freddie Flintoff’s Field of Dreams.  Once you get past the drama of ep one about whether any kids will turn up to his cricket team building, ep two really gets going, as we hear the kids’ back stories and seeFreddie’s influence on them.  Special shout out to Afghan refugee Adnan, who is a total ledge.”

The Arts Desk: 

“Flintoff, an emphatically not-posh Lancastrian, is proving to be a skilful motivator, able to combine common sense and a sympathetic manner with a dose of confrontational bluntness when required. As one of his coaching assistants, former Lancashire teammate Kyle Hogg, remarks of their raw recruits, “there are a couple who test you to the absolute maximum.” It’s part of the show’s game-plan to throw in some social observation and real-life stories of struggle against the odds, and the tale of how Flintoff gradually pulls his initially reluctant band of young scruffs into something resembling a team can only be described as heart-warming.”

The Cricketer:   

“Visibility, image and perception are problems for cricket at all levels, from the professional game right the way down to grassroots clubs. Whether it’s fair or not, cricket is associated with elitism, racism, wealth and cliques.  And while Flintoff’s documentary only scratches the surface of these issues and the potential solutions, shining the light on just one community – Preston’s forgotten male youth, it will hopefully trigger conversations, some of them possibly unwelcome, which will shape the future of cricket.”